american dream statistics

All that Glitters: Achieving the American Dream

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Most people want to be rich, own a huge house and afford the finer things in life. Even great characters like Gatsby couldn’t help but let the desire for wealth drive their actions. But we do it every day. When we envy celebrities, chance our luck at the lottery… we strive to achieve the American Dream. But what are your chances of owning that mansion and glittering silverware?

Those who succeed consistently from early childhood to adulthood have an 85% success of achieving the American Dream. If you’re born to a n upper-income family, then you’re in luck! You have a 74% chance of rolling around in fresh dough. If you’re Caucasian (70%) or a man (66%) then you’re more likely to be spending your summers in a beach house, drinking martinis. This is not true, however, for others. Women only have a 62% chance of achieving the American Dream, while Hispanics are at 59%. What causes these disparities? Sometimes it’s where you’re born. Those born to a disadvantaged family will have only a 56% chance of achieving the dream, while if you’re born to a low income family you have a slimmer 52%. African Americans are at the lowest bar, at 50%, only above those who fail consistently at life stages from childhood to adulthood.

If you think some of these stats are unfair, then do some brainstorming. What makes some people more likely to succeed then others? And how can we change the way money is distributed in the U.S.?

Who knows, maybe you can be the next savior of the American Dream!

jessica_fink
By Jessica Fink
Statistic Brain Researcher

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Statistic Sources & References
Source: Statistic Brain Research Institute (Online / Direct Response Mail)
Content Author: Statistic Brain

Date research was conducted: August 11, 2016

All that Glitters: Achieving the American Dream

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